RDKB's Mosquito Control Program

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Our public consultation is now closed, so watch for the renewed pest management plan to be posted in our documents section on this page in the coming weeks.

On behalf of the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB), Morrow BioScience Ltd. is in the process of renewing RDKB’s Pest Management Plan (PMP). The PMP will provide direction for RDKB’s Mosquito Control Program in response to nuisance, economic, and environmental concerns of mosquitos. A major part of the process is engagement with local First Nations, other levels of government, resource users, and any other interested stakeholders.

Through February and March

Our public consultation is now closed, so watch for the renewed pest management plan to be posted in our documents section on this page in the coming weeks.

On behalf of the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB), Morrow BioScience Ltd. is in the process of renewing RDKB’s Pest Management Plan (PMP). The PMP will provide direction for RDKB’s Mosquito Control Program in response to nuisance, economic, and environmental concerns of mosquitos. A major part of the process is engagement with local First Nations, other levels of government, resource users, and any other interested stakeholders.

Through February and March 2021, residents in the Grand Forks, Electoral Area 'D' and Christina Lake were invited to:

  • have a look at the map below of the known mosquito sites, and
  • provide comments and ask questions regarding RDKB's Pest Management Plan and Mosquito Control Program by posting a comment.

Area Covered by the PMP

The geographic boundaries of the PMP are limited to public and private lands within the following areas:

  • Grand Forks and surrounding area.
  • Electoral Area ‘D’/Rural Grand Forks along the Granby River, 20km north from Grand Forks and surrounding area.
  • Christina Lake and surrounding area.

Most mosquito development sites are located in floodwater areas and rainwater catchments associated with the Kettle and Granby Rivers, Christina Lake and Christina Lake outflow.

Activity on other Provincial Crown lands will be under the jurisdiction of this PMP but will only be considered after discussions with the appropriate Provincial Ministry. All other Federal Crown lands and Private lands are not covered directly under this PMP but may be considered for control after engagement with the appropriate stakeholders.

Mosquito Control (2021-2026)

RDKB’s Mosquito Control Program will be carried out using current best management practices. Mosquito control has three major phases:

  • Public Education.
  • Mapping and Monitoring.
  • Larval Control.

Public Education is conducted throughout the affected areas and may include social media, newspaper and radio advertisements as well as brochures, posters, and event attendance. This portion of the Mosquito Control Program continues throughout the year.

During the summer months, the Mosquito Control Program will engage in mapping and monitoring of known and new mosquito development sites. The Mosquito Control Program uses local knowledge and detailed maps to accurately capture the location and then monitor these mosquito development sites.

Larval control involves applying a target specific larvicide to active mosquito development sites. The PMP outlines that bacterial agent “Bti” will be used as a larvicide. “Bti” is formulated specifically for control of mosquito larva and is registered for use in Canada. “Bti” is known to be fairly specific to mosquitoes, non-toxic, and non-residual.

The RDKB does not use chemical controls on adult mosquitos as part of their mosquito control program.

Post your comments here

This is a place for you to post your comments regarding RDKB's Mosquito Control Program

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Thank you for the opportunity to comment. I live on Brown Creek Road and have noticed a significant decline in swallows over the past decade. When I first moved here, the power lines were full of swallows at the end of July as they gathered prior to heading south. I would prefer there was no mosquito control in this area as the swallows and other creatures rely on flying insects for their survival. But I know others feel differently and horses especially are bothered by mosquitoes. I don't know what the solution is, but I'm not convinced we know enough about the long-term consequences of mosquito control and are tinkering too much with nature.

Margaret 6 months ago

Living directly in one of the identified areas (East cascade on the river) I watch the application of (???) every year. I must say that if there is an effect it is not noticeable. What I mean is every year and during various periods of those years there are always mosquitoes, bothersome to the point we avoid specific areas during certain times of day and sometimes for extended periods lasting weeks, once things dry up they tend to drop to a tolerable level and then the wasps come,,all cyclic and predictable. No doubt these creatures serve a purpose and removing them no doubt has a disservice to other organisms within the area. So does the effort meet the needs,?(environment of which humans are a small pert of), I would say it does not, it never eliminates the issue (being bothered) and no doubt has a negative effect in the short and long term. Being vectors for disease is speculative at best in the area and may give purpose should it become a reality, economic insult should not be a deciding factor and local enjoyment of ones back deck can be achieved by planning and putting up with the environment we live in, eliminating parts of our environment for our enjoyment is an inane way to approach this world. Not sure what the cost on this program but I am sure it substantial.

Jeff Olsen 8 months ago

Since I am not an expert in the use of pesticides, I researched a little bit about what the scientists think. There appears to be general consent as follows: "Bti has been used in mosquito control programs to reduce nuisance ... for decades and is generally considered an environmentally-safe, effective and target-specific biocide. However, the use of Bti is not uncontroversial. Target mosquitoes and affected midges represent an important food source for many aquatic and terrestrial predators and reduction of their populations is likely to result in food-web effects at higher trophic levels. In the context of global biodiversity loss, this appears particularly critical since treated wetlands are often representing conservation areas...Some studies suggest that continuous application of Bti over a period of 2-3 years to wetlands may result in an overall decrease of biodiversity."
I therefore propose to err on the safe side and do not apply a Bti based mosquito control program in Christina Lake.

Raimund 8 months ago

The ecosystem is a system. All of the parts and processes are important. The animals in the region are all part of the same chain. If you are destroying one part of the chain it impacts the others. Mosquitoes exist for a reason - they feed other animals in the wetlands, the swamps, the riparian zones. When you kill them off you are killing off other animals that feed on them. This spraying program is short-sighted and will have negative long-term impacts on the ecosystems in the region. I do not believe that it is eco-friendly in any way. That sounds like a lot of greenwash. Humans can adjust to some mosquitoes every year. The ecosystems cannot adapt to the continued removal of important parts.

David Chapman 8 months ago

Glad to hear this spray affects mosquito's mostly, not others, like bees that we do need.
I agree with spraying for Mosquitos & their larva.
Thank you.

louiseosborn 8 months ago

Working for 14 years as the Park Ranger at Christina Lake I have seen the effectiveness of the Mosquito Control Program first hand. Prior to this program happening working in the parks especially at the south end of Christina Lake was to be attacked by swarms of mosquitos. With application of biological solutions, the mosquito problem has diminished greatly. I urge to continue this program as the very unstable economy at Christina Lake is seriously impacted by a lack of tourism and mosquitos are a prime reason tourism can suffer. Besides what is done now other natural mosquito deterrents should be investigated, such as introducing native fish into the lake. As someone who has lived here since 1970 I have seen the abuse the lake fishery has taken from over fishing, chemical dumping of such items as pesticides and herbicides use by lake front land owners. Personally where I live in Fife, I have planted flowers and native berry bushes to encourage birds to control insects around my house. This works very well. these two option should be encouraged and researched further.

2dthome 8 months ago
Page last updated: 01 April 2021, 09:52