South Kootenay Green Link Active Transportation Plan

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JOIN THE CONVERSATION - SHAPE THE FUTURE OF ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION IN SOUTH KOOTENAY

The South Kootenay Green Link: Connecting Communities, Promoting Healthy Living, and Fostering Environmental Sustainability


Project Background

The South Kootenay region, celebrated for cultivating both professional and recreational sports enthusiasts, is setting its sights on a new, ambitious initiative - the South Kootenay Green Link Active Transportation Plan (ATP). With a $50,000 grant from BC's Active Transportation Network Planning program, matched by funds from the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB), we are poised to create a comprehensive, accessible, multi-use active transportation connection between Rossland and Fruitvale.


Plan Process

Objective

The South Kootenay Green Link ATP will establish an integrated active transportation corridor that promotes sustainable and healthy modes of travel. The project will address the need for safe, interconnected routes for cyclists, pedestrians, and other active transportation users. It will tackle the region's unique challenges, such as varying elevations and routes adjacent to highways. By focusing on inclusivity and adhering to best practices from the BC Active Transportation Design Guide, the ATP seeks to make active transportation a practical and attractive choice for all residents.


Safety and Challenges

Despite the natural beauty and opportunities for outdoor activities in the region, there is a lack of interconnected, safe, and accessible routes for cyclists, pedestrians and other active transportation users. This hinders the ability of residents to adopt more sustainable modes of transportation, leading to increased car usage, environmental impact, and missed opportunities for health and well-being. The region presents unique challenges for active transportation, including varying elevations and direct routes adjacent to highways. The planning process will explore solutions to these issues.


Solution

The South Kootenay Green Link ATP aims to address these challenges by developing an All Ages and Abilities (AAA) active transportation corridor, guided by the BC Active Transportation Design Guide (2019). This Active Transportation connection will be comfortable, convenient, attractive, and safe for everyone, encouraging more residents to embrace active transportation and leading to a healthier, more environmentally conscious community.


Engagement and Feedback

The South Kootenay Green Link led by the Steering Committee, comprising of representatives from the involved communities and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, is committed to engaging stakeholders and the public throughout the process. Together, we can create a vibrant, connected, and sustainable active transportation network.


What is Active Transportation?

Active transportation, as defined in the BC Active Transportation Design Guide, includes any form of human-powered transportation, including walking, cycling, or rolling using a skateboard, in-line skates, wheelchair or other wheel-based forms of human-powered transportation.




JOIN THE CONVERSATION - SHAPE THE FUTURE OF ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION IN SOUTH KOOTENAY

The South Kootenay Green Link: Connecting Communities, Promoting Healthy Living, and Fostering Environmental Sustainability


Project Background

The South Kootenay region, celebrated for cultivating both professional and recreational sports enthusiasts, is setting its sights on a new, ambitious initiative - the South Kootenay Green Link Active Transportation Plan (ATP). With a $50,000 grant from BC's Active Transportation Network Planning program, matched by funds from the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB), we are poised to create a comprehensive, accessible, multi-use active transportation connection between Rossland and Fruitvale.


Plan Process

Objective

The South Kootenay Green Link ATP will establish an integrated active transportation corridor that promotes sustainable and healthy modes of travel. The project will address the need for safe, interconnected routes for cyclists, pedestrians, and other active transportation users. It will tackle the region's unique challenges, such as varying elevations and routes adjacent to highways. By focusing on inclusivity and adhering to best practices from the BC Active Transportation Design Guide, the ATP seeks to make active transportation a practical and attractive choice for all residents.


Safety and Challenges

Despite the natural beauty and opportunities for outdoor activities in the region, there is a lack of interconnected, safe, and accessible routes for cyclists, pedestrians and other active transportation users. This hinders the ability of residents to adopt more sustainable modes of transportation, leading to increased car usage, environmental impact, and missed opportunities for health and well-being. The region presents unique challenges for active transportation, including varying elevations and direct routes adjacent to highways. The planning process will explore solutions to these issues.


Solution

The South Kootenay Green Link ATP aims to address these challenges by developing an All Ages and Abilities (AAA) active transportation corridor, guided by the BC Active Transportation Design Guide (2019). This Active Transportation connection will be comfortable, convenient, attractive, and safe for everyone, encouraging more residents to embrace active transportation and leading to a healthier, more environmentally conscious community.


Engagement and Feedback

The South Kootenay Green Link led by the Steering Committee, comprising of representatives from the involved communities and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, is committed to engaging stakeholders and the public throughout the process. Together, we can create a vibrant, connected, and sustainable active transportation network.


What is Active Transportation?

Active transportation, as defined in the BC Active Transportation Design Guide, includes any form of human-powered transportation, including walking, cycling, or rolling using a skateboard, in-line skates, wheelchair or other wheel-based forms of human-powered transportation.



Questions

Do you have questions about the South Kootenay Green Link Active Transportation Plan? Just reach out here! 

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  • Share How will you maintain it in the winter ? on Facebook Share How will you maintain it in the winter ? on Twitter Share How will you maintain it in the winter ? on Linkedin Email How will you maintain it in the winter ? link

    How will you maintain it in the winter ?

    Larry Doell asked 12 months ago

    Thank you for your question. We haven't determined yet whether the Green Link will be an all season trail, but it will be taken into consideration as the Active Transportation Plan is developed. Maintenance will be dependent on the types of pathways that are created.

  • Share I could phrase it as a question but it's essentially a piece of input so I will share it as such I see the biggest obstacle to traveling the Kootenays by bike are the, sometimes very long, uphills. There is simply no realistic way to move people uphill that doesn't require power. In Norway there is a bike lift that the user activates and the lift brings them up a hill, a video showing this lift can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zipZ5kwhFfs. The main difference I would suggest is that the lift pushes the bike rather than someone using their foot. A lift like the one in the video, assuming its construction, is quite efficient. Such a lift on the Trail/Rossland hill, for example, could function not only as a service for commuters, but also for people who mountain bike down hill and would otherwise shuttle back up the hill in a vehicle. I have engineering and planning skills and would be happy to work on a preliminary proposal for such a system if there is interest. BR on Facebook Share I could phrase it as a question but it's essentially a piece of input so I will share it as such I see the biggest obstacle to traveling the Kootenays by bike are the, sometimes very long, uphills. There is simply no realistic way to move people uphill that doesn't require power. In Norway there is a bike lift that the user activates and the lift brings them up a hill, a video showing this lift can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zipZ5kwhFfs. The main difference I would suggest is that the lift pushes the bike rather than someone using their foot. A lift like the one in the video, assuming its construction, is quite efficient. Such a lift on the Trail/Rossland hill, for example, could function not only as a service for commuters, but also for people who mountain bike down hill and would otherwise shuttle back up the hill in a vehicle. I have engineering and planning skills and would be happy to work on a preliminary proposal for such a system if there is interest. BR on Twitter Share I could phrase it as a question but it's essentially a piece of input so I will share it as such I see the biggest obstacle to traveling the Kootenays by bike are the, sometimes very long, uphills. There is simply no realistic way to move people uphill that doesn't require power. In Norway there is a bike lift that the user activates and the lift brings them up a hill, a video showing this lift can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zipZ5kwhFfs. The main difference I would suggest is that the lift pushes the bike rather than someone using their foot. A lift like the one in the video, assuming its construction, is quite efficient. Such a lift on the Trail/Rossland hill, for example, could function not only as a service for commuters, but also for people who mountain bike down hill and would otherwise shuttle back up the hill in a vehicle. I have engineering and planning skills and would be happy to work on a preliminary proposal for such a system if there is interest. BR on Linkedin Email I could phrase it as a question but it's essentially a piece of input so I will share it as such I see the biggest obstacle to traveling the Kootenays by bike are the, sometimes very long, uphills. There is simply no realistic way to move people uphill that doesn't require power. In Norway there is a bike lift that the user activates and the lift brings them up a hill, a video showing this lift can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zipZ5kwhFfs. The main difference I would suggest is that the lift pushes the bike rather than someone using their foot. A lift like the one in the video, assuming its construction, is quite efficient. Such a lift on the Trail/Rossland hill, for example, could function not only as a service for commuters, but also for people who mountain bike down hill and would otherwise shuttle back up the hill in a vehicle. I have engineering and planning skills and would be happy to work on a preliminary proposal for such a system if there is interest. BR link

    I could phrase it as a question but it's essentially a piece of input so I will share it as such I see the biggest obstacle to traveling the Kootenays by bike are the, sometimes very long, uphills. There is simply no realistic way to move people uphill that doesn't require power. In Norway there is a bike lift that the user activates and the lift brings them up a hill, a video showing this lift can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zipZ5kwhFfs. The main difference I would suggest is that the lift pushes the bike rather than someone using their foot. A lift like the one in the video, assuming its construction, is quite efficient. Such a lift on the Trail/Rossland hill, for example, could function not only as a service for commuters, but also for people who mountain bike down hill and would otherwise shuttle back up the hill in a vehicle. I have engineering and planning skills and would be happy to work on a preliminary proposal for such a system if there is interest. BR

    MP asked 12 months ago

    I agree that the hills are one of the biggest challenges to getting folks to use active transportation in our area. Thank you for the information on the bike lifts, which will be taken into consideration as we develope the plan. You can email me your contact information if you discuss further. ddean@rdkb.com

Page last updated: 08 Jun 2024, 10:51 AM